Tag: QPP

Quality Payment Program (MIPS) PY 2019 Webinar 03.29.2019

This presentation is to review the changes in the MIPS Performance Year 2019 Program.

 

Recommended attendees:

  • Office Managers
  • Reporting Clinicians
  • Assisting Medical Staff

 

Register for our Quality Payment Program (MIPS) PY 2019 Webinar today:

 

 

Quality Payment Program (MIPS) PY 2019 Webinar 03.20.2019

This presentation is to review the changes in the MIPS Performance Year 2019 Program.

 

Recommended attendees:

  • Office Managers
  • Reporting Clinicians
  • Assisting Medical Staff

 

Register for our Quality Payment Program (MIPS) PY 2019 Webinar today:

 

 

Quality Payment Program (MIPS) PY 2019 Webinar 03.14.2019

This presentation is to review the changes in the MIPS Performance Year 2019 Program.

 

Recommended attendees:

  • Office Managers
  • Reporting Clinicians
  • Assisting Medical Staff

 

Register for our Quality Payment Program (MIPS) PY 2019 Webinar today:

 

 

Quality Payment Program (MIPS) PY 2019 Webinar 03.07.2019

This presentation is to review the changes in the MIPS Performance Year 2019 Program.

 

Recommended attendees:

  • Office Managers
  • Reporting Clinicians
  • Assisting Medical Staff

 

Register for our Quality Payment Program (MIPS) PY 2019 Webinar today:

 

 

Most ACOs Would Leave MSSP if Forced Into Risk, Survey Finds

Most ACOs would leave MSSP if forced into risk, survey finds | DAS Health

Nearly three-fourths of accountable care organizations will leave the Medicare Shared Savings Program next year if they are forced to assume risk, according to a new survey by the National Association of ACOs.

Of the 82 ACOs the group surveyed, 71% said they will likely exit the MSSP if they have to start taking on risk. About 6% said they are unsure, while 23% indicated they would likely remain in the program.

Under the Affordable Care Act, ACOs that entered MSSP Track 1 in 2012 or 2013 are expected to convert to a risk-based model in their third contract period, which starts next year.

“These results paint a bleak future of what will happen if the government keeps its mandate to push ACOs into risk,” Clif Gaus, president and CEO of NAACOS, said in a statement. “It’s naive to think ACOs that aren’t ready will be forced into risk in what is ultimately a voluntary program. The more likely outcome will be that many ACOs quit the program, divest their care coordination resources and return to payment models that emphasize volume over value.”

While the survey involved just those ACOs that will face risk requirements next year, the fallout from forcing risk on ACOs will be an ongoing issue as more of them approach their third agreement periods, NAACOS warns.

ACOs’ reasons for not being prepared to assume risk varied. The three top challenges cited were the amount of risk assumed, the possibility of unexpected changes to the ACO model or CMS rules, and the desire for more predictable financial projections.

NAACOS wrote to CMS Administrator Seema Verma in February, urging the agency to allow some ACOs to remain in Track 1 for a third contract period before shifting to a two-sided risk model. The exception would apply to ACOs that generate net savings across four performance years, ACOs that score at or above the 50th percentile in quality in two of three pay-for-performance years and ACOs that improve their overall quality score by 10 or more percentage points over their pay-for-performance years.

Providers’ lack of willingness to take up risk is a pervasive problem for the value-based care movement.

Studies have showed mixed results with ACOs. A recent analysis by Avalere found the MSSP missed federal cost-savings projections from 2010, when the ACA was enacted, by a wide margin. The Congressional Budget Office estimated the program would save Medicare $1.5 million from 2013 to 2016. Instead, it raised federal spending by $384 million, Avalere said.

A pair of studies published last year in JAMA Internal Medicine were more favorable. In one study, post-acute spending at 114 ACOs dropped 9% from 2012 to 2014. The other study showed savings at two ACOs in Colorado and Oregon, despite major differences in their structures.

AMA Calls for 90 Day MIPS Reporting Period

AMA Proposes Making MIPS Reporting Period only 90 Days | DAS Health

Reducing the Merit-based Incentive Payment System reporting period to 90 consecutive days instead of one year would “reduce administrative burden and ensure physicians have sufficient time to report after receiving performance feedback from CMS,” the American Medical Association argues in a letter sent to CMS Administrator Seema Verma.

The request was made after a “lack of timely and direct notification” from CMS on whether doctors are eligible for MIPS and a “severe delay” in updating the Quality Payment Program (QPP) website.

Physicians were not informed of their MIPS eligibility until early April despite being responsible for tracking and collecting data as of Jan. 1.

RELATED: Had trouble reporting for MIPS in 2017? Government Incentives services could help. 

AMA’s letter is the latest in a string of MIPS critiques from industry associations this year, the first in which reporting data will be used to determine payments. AMA is largely concerned with the burden of record keeping and data submission for physicians who did not discover their MIPS eligibility until more than three months into the year, and the association says shortening the reporting period to 90 days would allow clinicians to put “patients over paperwork.”

The letter cites a 2016 Health Affairs study that found physician practices in four common specialties spend an average of 785 hours per physician and more than $15.4 billion on quality measure reporting programs each year, with the majority of that time being spent “entering information into the medical record only for the purpose of reporting for quality measures from external entities.”

Last week, the American College of Physicians found many of those quality measures enforced by MIPS and QPP to be “not valid,” directly impacting patient care and costing practices more money. Practices spend about $40,000 a year per physician to report on performance, according to ACP. The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission has gone even further, and has pushed for complete MIPS repeal and instead suggests a new program that withholds a portion of payments to create a rewards pool.

CMS is not turning a blind eye to these critiques. Earlier this year, the agency invited physicians to participate in a yearlong study to assess the burden of reporting under MIPS, though some experts seemed skeptical of the idea that physicians, already overburdened with reporting requirements, would want to participate.

It was reported last month that CMS is looking to overhaul MACRA, which created MIPS, remove reporting barriers for quality measures and launch more alternative payment models this year. Cutting regulatory burdens and offering providers more options are some of the Trump administration’s stated healthcare goals.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.

Please complete the sign in form below.

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

Please complete the sign in form below.







Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.



Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.


Enter code DAShealth to view video.

Enter code DAShealth to view video.
CONTACT YOUR ACCOUNT MANAGER TODAY FOR MORE DETAILS!